You’ve never heard of the interrobang?!

You’ve never heard of the interrobang?!

You’ve never heard of the interrobang?!

By Laura Hale Brockway | Posted: September 24, 2013
 
It’s the Wild West out there—in the world of style and usage, that is: nouns becoming verbsliterally now meaning not literally; and now, made-up punctuation marks. 

I am referring to the interrobang, which I had never heard of until a friend recently told me about it. A “new social media icon” according to The Guardian, the interrobang is a non-standard punctuation mark—?! or !?—used at the end of a sentence that asks a question in an excited manner, expresses excitement or disbelief in the form of a question, or asks a rhetorical question. For example:

• You won the lottery and you’ll never have to work again?! 

• The IT department said “no” to your request for a bigger email in-box!? 

• You haven’t submitted any expense reports since February!? 

• You mean the executives purposefully set goals for us that we can’t attain?!

In the spirit of combining punctuation marks to create something new, how about putting together the period and the question mark. You could use these marks together to express doubt about a statement.

• Earth is only 6,000 years old.? 

• Dinosaurs and people lived at the same time.?

Or the period and the exclamation point, when you’re not sure exactly how much emphasis you want to give your sentence. 

• Your brother—no matter what he says—cannot make you unconscious just by looking at you.! 

• So your team won the soccer game, but you have a concussion.! 

Use of the interrobang in informal writing is nothing new. Writers use alternating question marks and exclamation points for emphasis, as in “He said what!?!?!?”

[RELATED: Learn to write smarter at our PR Writers Summit.]

 
According to the Chicago Manual of Style, using multiple punctuation marks counts as poor style in formal writing. So use the interrobang all you want when texting, but not in your press releases.

What new punctuation marks would you care to share?!?!? 

Laura Hale Brockway is an Austin-based writer and editor. Read more of her work atwww.impertinentremarks.com.

 

The world’s only undersea research lab – Aquarius Reef Base

http://news.fiu.edu/2013/09/under-the-atlantic-aquarius-reef-base-offers-a-window-on-the-ocean-and-space/67521

Aquarius Reef Base – the world’s only undersea research lab – has come back to life under the auspices of Florida International University.

The 7 daily rules of PR

The 7 daily rules of PR

The 7 daily rules of PR

By Sara Nugent | Posted: September 17, 2013
 
 
There’s a daily rhythm to public relations that can help anyone in the business be more effective in the relentless pursuit of client results. Sure it includes the basics: 

Checking news feeds, reading top stories of the day, monitoring the Web for client mentions, and responding to clients and media.

There are specific things you can do to sharpen your strategic focus, though, so we surveyed our staff at Gregory FCA and came up with seven daily to-dos that help them get breakthrough results for clients:

1. Run your job like a newsroom. 

(From Mike Lizun, senior vice president)

Start each day reviewing breaking and trending news stories. Look for opportunities to inject clients into the conversation. Would American intervention in Syria spell more opportunity for a client who relies on government contracts? Does a website outage provide an opportunity for a software client to provide commentary? What do the latest consumer confidence numbers mean for a financial services client? New stories break every moment of the day. Convert your office to echo a newsroom, constantly identifying the breaking news that provides PR opportunities. 

2. Closely align media outreach with your client’s schedule.

(From Bradd Delmuto, vice president, and Alicia Buonanno, associate vice president) 

Access and availability alone can often trigger media interest. Synchronize media targeting with your client’s travel schedule, using availability as a reason for making introductions and securing briefing and on-air appearances.

3. Refine your story according to past media coverage.

(From Greg Matusky, president, and Jimmy Moock, vice president )

The media often tells stories and finds angles better than clients and PR agencies. Closely track how the media is covering your client and adopt future pitches accordingly. Reuse compelling turns of phrases and convert past headlines into subject lines as a way to build on past media success.

4. Stop using Cision and Vocus as crutches. 

(From Greg Matusky, president )

Media databases all too often promote lazy, shotgun pitches that alienate the media. Instead, do your own research to target reporters by their beat and better understand their interests. The era of mass pitching is over, and so, too, might be canned media databases, now that everything is online.

 

[RELATED: Find out about our November event that has instruction for your entire communications team.]

 

5. Coordinate Twitter searches with trending hashtags. 

(From Jessica Attanasio, associate vice president, and Matt McLoughlin, associate vice president)

Adjust Twitter search criteria throughout the day in order to identify trends and breaking news. Use Twitter to stay on top of breaking and trending stories and inject clients into the conversation. 

6. Have shareable content at the ready. 

(From Alicia Buonanno, associate vice president, and Bradd Delmuto, vice president)

Re-work, reuse, and repurpose past content in new ways to give it fresh life on social and digital media. Now that content is king, there’s no such thing as a slow client news day. Keep bylined stories, commentary, infographics, and infotoons nearby, and use them as a way to constantly share insights with the media or directly to the masses via social media.

7. Build a fire under your clients.

(Katie Kennedy, associate vice president)

Hit them daily with new ideas, trending stories, and opportunities to comment on any moving story that impacts their viewpoint, business, product, or profitability. By doing so, you train clients to realize that news flows by the minute, and that there’s always an opportunity to gain coverage, provide comment, or add to the conversation. 

Sara Nugent is an associate editor for Gregory FCA. A version of this story originally appeared on the agency’s blog, Gregarious.

 
 

The Dos and Don’ts of Pitching Journalists on Social Media

The Dos and Don’ts of Pitching Journalists on Social Media

 
Pitch-journalists
Photo

BY ZOE FOX1 DAY AGO

Social media is a blessing and a curse when it comes to pitching journalists.

While Twitter,FacebookLinkedInFoursquare and Instagram — yes, Foursquare and Instagram pitches happen — present many new opportunities to forge connections, it’s very easy to step onto inappropriate turf.

Because the dos and don’ts of reaching out via social media can be messy, we compiled some solid rules for when it’s cool and when it’s creepy to contact a journalist. Here are 10 tips on how to pitch a journalist on social media, largely based on the experiences ofMashable‘s editorial team.

Let us know in the comments if you have other best practices for pitching, favorite ways to be reached or disagree with our list.

1. Twitter can be a great place to reach out.

Generally speaking, Twitter can be a great place to pitch journalists who are often very engaged with Twitter. As somewhat public figures, journalists treat their Twitter accounts at least partially professional, so they’ll likely be happy to chat with you on Twitter about topics relating to their beats.

That said, many journalists receive a ton of pitches on Twitter, so be mindful of your first approach. If you just tweet “Hey reporter, I have something I think you’ll like — DM me,” you’re leaving the journalist absolutely no reason to reply. Try to include a link to some news or @mention the brand or organization you’re representing. If journalists recognize the company or are interested in the link you share, they’re much more likely to reply.

An even better approach is to build a relationship through personal or funny interactions leading up to your pitch.

2. Don’t ask a journalist you’re not following to DM you.

If you’re not a regular user, it can help to master the Twitter basics. You want to be careful with the Twitter lingo you employ, as well.

For example, if you tell a journalist to DM you her email address or just to follow up, make sure you’re following her. You can’t DM a user who doesn’t follow you. Furthermore, don’t ask a journalist to follow you so that you can send her a DM; it’s impolite and unnecessary. Simply follow the journalist you’re messaging and tell her to DM you her contact information.

3. Facebook is for friends, and friends don’t pitch friends.

Journalists by and large never want to be pitched on Facebook. Even though Facebook now has many non-social uses — from media organizations sharing breaking news to the Followfeature — this doesn’t mean the network has turned all business. Journalists, especially ones who consider their Twitter account to be an extension of their reporting, want to maintain some semblance of privacy on Facebook.

Facebook messaging also includes a technical hurdle. If you try to message someone you’re not friends with, your message will land in their other messages folder, which likely goes unchecked.

Last year, Facebook rolled out the ability to pay to message people you’re not friends with. But just because the feature exists, it doesn’t mean you should use it, because Facebook is a social network for friends.

You should also avoid creative alternatives to messaging, such as commenting on cover photos or public shares with pitches.

4. Don’t follow up more than once.

 

videographers

 

This point is short and sweet, the way your pitches should be. Follow up twice, shame on you. Follow up three, four, five or six times, you’re spam.

5. Don’t contact one journalist to get to his colleague.

Some journalists get way more pitches and Twitter messages than others. And, yes, a journalist on Twitter with fewer interactions and followers may be more likely to spot an @mention, but do not go through a junior journalist to get to his colleague.

Mashable intern received the following message about one of our senior reporters: “I saw her number of followers and thought it would be easier to reach her this way.”

Don’t be that person.

6. Know the journalist’s beat and the publication’s content before you pitch.

Before you pitch, do your research. Social media can be enormously helpful for that. Are you pitching a person or product that this reporter would find relevant? Does the publication you’re pitching produce stories about related topics? Although these may sound like basics, they’re ignored more often than you may think.

Conveniently, social media can help you learn about the reporters you’re pitching. Are you pitching them a story related to the topics they cover or tweet about? I write about social good, which I’ve written in my author description on Mashable and in my Twitter bio. Yet, somehow, less than half of the pitches I receive take my focus into consideration.

Unless you have a close relationship with a journalist, you should not be asking him who is the best person to pitch at his outlet. It’s your job to do the research and ours to determine your pitch’s relevance to our audience and publication.

7. Don’t ask for an email address that’s listed on Twitter.

This sounds like a no-brainer, but make sure to check if a journalist publicly lists her email address before you ask for it on Twitter. Many journalists do list their contact information in their Twitter or Facebook bios. Be sure to check both before you send the “how can I contact you” tweet.

8. Personal email addresses and cellphone numbers are not for pitches.

 

Reporter's notebook

 

We all have too much email, and we want our work emails sent to our work addresses so we can reserve our personal address for family, friends and non-work messages. Unless you’re pitching a freelancer, be sure to send your message to a work address.

Cellphone numbers should be treated the same way, although unfortunately it’s harder to judge whether a phone number with no extra information is a mobile or landline.

In the rare case a journalist publicly lists a cellphone number, you’re free to pitch it. If you’ve somehow ended up with his cellphone number because he attended an event that required it for sign-in, you should respect his privacy and not call a number you know to be personal.

9. A tweet reminder about the Facebook message you sent saying you emailed a pitch is unnecessary.

It’s appropriate to follow up on a pitch once, but that’s two attempts total on all platforms — not two per platform. This means, if you tweet and email, those are your two shots. Don’t send an email, tweet, follow-up email and follow-up tweet. That’s overkill.

Furthermore, don’t tweet a reminder about a LinkedIn message about an email.

10. Remember tweets are public; don’t mass tweet pitches to several reporters and outlets.

If you have a story you really want to be picked up but have absolutely no idea what outlet or reporter may be interested, don’t leave a trail on Twitter.

As soon as you pitch a journalist, they will likely click on your Twitter profile to learn more. If they see that your last 20 tweets are copy-pasted versions of the tweet you sent him, he’ll quickly lose interest.

Additionally, don’t pitch organizations by their Twitter accounts. Most news outlets receive way too many Twitter mentions for their social media team to read through, so your pitch will probably never be seen. Your time is better spent narrowing down which reporter would be the best fit for your pitch.

Images: Flickr, Repórter do FuturoRichard MasonerRoger H. Goun

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

12 writing mistakes nearly everyone makes

12 writing mistakes nearly everyone makes

12 writing mistakes nearly everyone makes

By Gini Dietrich | Posted: September 16, 2013
 
As more and more organizations get into owned media, the grammar police seem to be in greater force.

Poor Sam Fiorella. Every time he writes something, he asks three or four of us to make sure he isn’t going to be crucified by the grammar police. It’s become quite comical, and we enjoy giving him a hard time about it.

He’s not alone. Many business leaders stress about writing anything at all, for fear of having incorrect grammar that will be ridiculed.

Between not knowing correct grammar and the text lexicon, it’s no wonder people are fearful of not just writing, but publishing, their work.

Though I am certainly no Grammar Girl, I have found there are mistakes nearly everyone makes, particularly when writing for the Web.

1. Affect vs. effect. The easiest way to remember the difference between the two is affect means “to influence.” So if you’re going to influence something, you will affect it. If it’s the result of something, it’s an effect.

2. The Oxford comma. In a series of three or more terms, you should use what’s referred to as the Oxford comma. This means you should have a comma before the word “and” in a list. For instance: The Unites States’ flag is red, white, and blue. Many people debate this, but I’m a believer in it because there are times when you don’t have the extra comma and the sentence doesn’t make sense. I prefer to err on the side of having the Oxford in there, for the sake of clarity.

3. Commas, in general. Slow down when you’re writing, and read your copy out loud. You don’t want to make this mistake: Let’s eat grandma vs. let’s eat, grandma. Poor grandma will be eaten if you forget the comma.

4. Their, they’re, and there. You’d think everyone learned this rule in fourth grade, but it’s a very common mistake. Use “there” when referring to a location, “their” to indicate possession, and “they’re” when you mean to say “they are.”

5. Care less. The dismissive “I could care less” you hear all the time is incorrect. If you could care less, that means there is more you could care less about the topic. Most people omit the “not” in that phrase. It should be, “I couldn’t care less.”

6. Irregardless. This word doesn’t exist. It should be regardless.

7. Nauseous. How many times have you said you felt nauseous? This is incorrect. You feel nauseated. Nauseous means something is sickening.

8. Your and you’re. Another mistake you see in people’s social media profiles and in the content they create is not correctly using “your” and “you’re.” If you’re meaning to say “you are,” the correct word is “you’re” (as at the beginning of this sentence). Otherwise the word is “your.”

9. Fewer vs. less. Another common mistake, “less” refers to quantity and “fewer” to a number. For instance, Facebook has fewer than 5,000 employees.

10. Quotation marks. Among great debate, people ask all the time whether punctuation belongs inside or outside quotation marks. It belongs inside, except for colons and semicolons. Question mark placement varies according to the context.

11. More than vs. over. I’m pretty sure the advertising agency created this grammatical error. Instead of saying, “We had more than 50 percent growth” in ad copy, “over” allows for more space. So they say, “We had over 50 percent growth.” Drives. Me. Crazy.

12. Me vs. I. I was reading something by a big muckety-muck the other day, and the copy read, “This year has brought a big personal development for my wife and I…” No, no, no! If you were going to say that without the mention of your wife, you wouldn’t say, “This year has brought a big personal development for I.” You would say “me.” So this year has brought a big personal development for my wife and me.

There are so many grammar mistakes made today that “The Elements of Style” is on its fourth edition. Also check out the “AP Stylebook.” Although most business writers don’t abide by those rules, most PR professionals do.

[RELATED: Learn to write smarter at our PR Writers Summit.]

Having a copy of both (and referring to them) and asking an editor for help (even if it’s informally, as Sam does) mean you’ll never have to worry about the grammar police. 

Gini Dietrich is founder and CEO of Arment Dietrich, Inc. This story originally appeared on the blogSpin Sucks.

Hispanic Heritage Month 2013: Sept. 15 – Oct. 15

Hispanic Heritage Month 2013: Sept. 15 – Oct. 15

Hispanic Heritage Month 2013: Sept. 15 – Oct. 15

In September 1968, Congress authorized President Lyndon B. Johnson to proclaim National Hispanic Heritage Week, observed during the week that included Sept. 15 and Sept. 16. The observance was expanded in 1989 by Congress to a month long celebration (Sept. 15 – Oct. 15), America celebrates the culture and traditions of those who trace their roots to Spain, Mexico and the Spanish-speaking nations of Central America, South America and the Caribbean.

Sept. 15 was chosen as the starting point for the celebration because it is the anniversary of independence of five Latin American countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence days on Sept. 16 and Sept. 18, respectively.

Population

graphic showing the Hispanic population of the United States- 53 million

53 million

The Hispanic population of the United States as of July 1, 2012, making people of Hispanic origin the nation’s largest ethnic or racial minority. Hispanics constituted 17 percent of the nation’s total population.
Source: 2012 Population Estimates <http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?src=bkmk>

1.1 million

Number of Hispanics added to the nation’s population between July 1, 2011, and July 1, 2012. This number is close to half of the approximately 2.3 million people added to the nation’s population during this period.
Source: 2012 Population Estimates
National Characteristics: Population by Sex, Race, and Hispanic origin <http://www.census.gov/popest/data/national/asrh/2012/index.html>, 
See first bullet under “Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin”

2.2%

Percentage increase in the Hispanic population between 2011 and 2012. Source: 2012 Population Estimates National Characteristics: Population by Sex, Race, and Hispanic origin <http://www.census.gov/popest/data/national/asrh/2012/index.html>, See first bullet under “Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin”

128.8 million

The projected Hispanic population of the United States in 2060. According to this projection, the Hispanic population will constitute 31 percent of the nation’s population by that date. Source: Population Projections <http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/population/cb08-123.html>

2nd

Ranking of the size of the U.S. Hispanic population worldwide, as of 2010. Only Mexico (112 million) had a larger Hispanic population than the United States (50.5 million).
Source: International Data Base <http://www.census.gov/population/international/data/idb/informationGateway.php>

65%

The percentage of Hispanic-origin people in the United States who were of Mexican background in 2011. Another 9.4 percent were of Puerto Rican background, 3.8 percent Salvadoran, 3.6 percent Cuban, 3.0 percent Dominican and 2.3 percent Guatemalan. The remainder was of some other Central American, South American or other Hispanic/Latino origin.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011 American Community Survey: Table B03001 <http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?fpt=table>

States and Counties

Florida

The state with the highest median age, 34, within the Hispanic population.
Source: 2012 Population Estimates
State Characteristics: Median Age by Race and Hispanic Origin <http://www.census.gov/popest/data/state/asrh/2012/index.html>

10 million

The estimated population for those of Hispanic-origin in Texas as of July 1, 2012.
Source: 2012 Population Estimates
State Characteristics: Population by Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin <http://www.census.gov/popest/data/state/asrh/2012/index.html>

8

The number of states with a population of 1 million or more Hispanic residents in 2012 — Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, New Jersey, New York and Texas.
Source: 2012 Population Estimates
State Characteristics: Population by Race and Hispanic Origin <http://www.census.gov/popest/data/state/asrh/2012/index.html>

More than 50%

The percent of all the Hispanic population that lived in California, Florida, and Texas as of July 1, 2012.
Source: 2012 Population Estimates
State Characteristics: Population by Race and Hispanic Origin <http://www.census.gov/popest/data/state/asrh/2012/index.html>

47%

The percentage of New Mexico’s population that was Hispanic as of July 1, 2012, the highest of any state.
Source: 2012 Population Estimates
State Characteristics: Population by Race and Hispanic Origin <http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/population/cb13-112.html>

14.5 million

The Hispanic population of California. This is the largest Hispanic population of any state as well as the largest numeric increase within the Hispanic population since July 1, 2011 (232,000).
Source: 2012 Population Estimates <http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/population/cb13-112.html>

4.8 million

The Hispanic population of Los Angeles County, Calif., in 2012. This is the highest of any county and the largest numeric increase since 2012 (55,000).
Source: 2012 Population Estimates <http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/population/cb13-112.html>

21

Number of states in which Hispanics were the largest minority group. These states were Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Massachusetts, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah, Washington and Wyoming.
Source: American FactFinder: United States DP-1 <http://factfinder2.census.gov>

Families and Children

11.6 million

The number of Hispanic family households in the United States in 2012.
Source: Families and Living Arrangements: Table F1 <http://www.census.gov/hhes/families/data/cps2012.html>

62.3%

The percentage of Hispanic family households that were married couple households in 2012.
Source: Families and Living Arrangements: Table F1 <http://www.census.gov/hhes/families/data/cps2012.html>

60.4%

The percentage of Hispanic married-couple households that had children younger than 18 present in 2012.
Source: Families and Living Arrangements: Table F1 <http://www.census.gov/hhes/families/data/cps2012.html>

65.7%

Percentage of Hispanic children living with two parents in 2012.
Source: Families and Living Arrangements: Table C9 <http://www.census.gov/hhes/families/data/cps2012.html>

45.3%

Percentage of Hispanic married couples with children under 18 where both spouses were employed in 2012.
Source: Families and Living Arrangements: Table FG-1 <http://www.census.gov/hhes/families/data/cps2012.html>

53 million

Spanish Language

37.6 million

chart showing Spanish Language spoke at home 37.6 million

The number of U.S. residents 5 and older who spoke Spanish at home in 2011. This is a 117 percent increase since 1990 when it was 17.3 million. Those who hablan español en casa constituted 12.9 percent of U.S. residents 5 and older. More than half of these Spanish speakers spoke English “very well.”
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011 American Community Survey: Table B16001
<http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_11_1YR_B16001&prodType=table>
and Language Use in the United States: 2007 <http://www.census.gov/prod/2010pubs/acs-12.pdf>

74.3%

Percentage of Hispanics 5 and older who spoke Spanish at home in 2011. 
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011 American Community Survey: Table B16006 
<http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_11_1YR_B16006&prodType=table>

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance

$38,624

The median income of Hispanic households in 2011.
Source: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2011, Table A
<http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/income_wealth/cb12-172.html>

25.3%

The poverty rate among Hispanics in 2011, down from 26.5 percent in 2010.
Source: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2011, Table B
<http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/income_wealth/cb12-172.html>

30.1%

The percentage of Hispanics who lacked health insurance in 2011.
Source: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2011, Table C-2
<http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/income_wealth/cb12-172.html>

Education

63.2%

The percentage of Hispanics 25 and older that had at least a high school education in 2011.
Source: American Community Survey: 2011 Table S0201 (crossed with Hispanic origin) 
<http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?fpt=table>

13.2%

The percentage of the Hispanic population 25 and older with a bachelor’s degree or higher in 2011.
Source: American Community Survey: 2011 Table S0201 (crossed with Hispanic origin)
<http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?fpt=table>

3.7 million

The number of Hispanics 25 and older who had at least a bachelor’s degree in 2011.
Source: American Community Survey: 2011 Table S0201 (crossed with Hispanic origin) 
<http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?fpt=table>

1.2 million

Number of Hispanics 25 and older with advanced degrees in 2011 (e.g., master’s, professional, doctorate).
Source: American Community Survey: 2011 Table S0201 (crossed with Hispanic origin) 
<http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?fpt=table>

14.5%

Percentage of students (both undergraduate and graduate students) enrolled in college in 2011 who were Hispanic.
Source: School Enrollment Data Current Population Survey: October 2011, Table 1
<http://www.census.gov/hhes/school/data/cps/2011/tables.html>

22.5%

Percentage of elementary and high school students that were Hispanic in 2011.
Source: School Enrollment Data Current Population Survey: October 2011, Table 1
<http://www.census.gov/hhes/school/data/cps/2011/tables.html>

Foreign-Born

36.2%

Percent of the Hispanic population that was foreign-born in 2011.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011 American Community Survey, Table: S0201
<http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_09_1YR_S0201&prodType=table>

Jobs

67.4%

Percentage of Hispanics or Latinos 16 and older who were in the civilian labor force in 2011.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011 American Community Survey, Table: S0201 (Hispanic)
<http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_11_1YR_S0201&prodType=table>

19.2%

The percentage of civilian employed Hispanics or Latinos 16 and older who worked in management, business, science, and arts occupations in 2011.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011 American Community Survey, Table: S0201 (Hispanic)
<http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/11_1YR/S0201//popgroup~400>

Voting

8.4%

The percentage of voters in the 2012 presidential election who were Hispanic. Hispanics comprised 7 percent of voters in 2010.
Source: News Release: Census Bureau Reports Hispanic Voter Turnout Reaches Record High for Congressional Election <http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/voting/cb11-164.html> and Voting and Registration in the Election of November 2012: Table 2 <http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/socdemo/voting/publications/p20/2012/tables.html>

Serving our Country

1.2 million

The number of Hispanics or Latinos 18 and older who are veterans of the U.S. armed forces.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011 American Community Survey: Table B21001I
<http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_11_1YR_B21001I&prodType=table>

Businesses

Source for statements in this section: Statistics for All U.S. Firms by Industry, Gender, Ethnicity, and Race for the U.S., States, Metro Areas, Counties, and Places: 2007, Table SB0700CSA01
<http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=SBO_2007_00CSA01&prodType=table>
Data for 2012 are being collected.

2.3 million

The number of Hispanic-owned businesses in 2007, up 43.6 percent from 2002.

$350.7 billion

Receipts generated by Hispanic-owned businesses in 2007, up 58.0 percent from 2002.

23.7%

The percentage of businesses in New Mexico in 2007 that were Hispanic-owned, which led all states. Florida (22.4 percent) and Texas (20.7 percent) were runners-up.

Following is a list of observances typically covered by the Census Bureau’s Facts for Features series:

  • African-American History Month (February)
  • Super Bowl
  • Valentine’s Day (Feb. 14)
  • Women’s History Month (March)
  • Irish-American Heritage Month (March)/
          St. Patrick’s Day (March 17)
  • Earth Day (April 22)
  • Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month (May)
  • Older Americans Month (May)
  • Cinco de Mayo (May 5)
  • Mother’s Day
  • Hurricane Season Begins (June 1)
  • Father’s Day
  • The Fourth of July (July 4)
  • Anniversary of Americans With Disabilities Act (July 26)
  • Back to School (August)
  • Labor Day
  • Grandparents Day
  • Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15-Oct. 15)
  • Unmarried and Single Americans Week
  • Halloween (Oct. 31)
  • American Indian/Alaska Native Heritage Month (November)
  • Veterans Day (Nov. 11)
  • Thanksgiving Day
  • The Holiday Season (December)

Editor’s note: The preceding data were collected from a variety of sources and may be subject to sampling variability and other sources of error. Facts for Features are customarily released about two months before an observance in order to accommodate magazine production timelines. Questions or comments should be directed to the Census Bureau’s Public Information Office: telephone: 301-763-3030; fax: 301-763-3762; or e-mail: <PIO@census.gov>.