Images in PR: 7 excuses and solutions

Images in PR: 7 excuses and solutions

Images in PR: 7 excuses and solutions

By Adam Cranfield | Posted: October 21, 2013
 
 
We’ve found there are six main reasons why PR practitioners and businesses avoid using images as part of their communications. 

We thought we’d suggest solutions to these problems so you can start creating more vibrantly eye-catching and interesting content.

“Our product is boring. I don’t think it would be a good subject for an interesting picture.”

All the more reason you should use creative images to enliven your communications. Think of Innocent Drinks. Their product is not unique, but their social media content is awash with images that are unrelated to their product but fit with the quirky image they’re trying to give their brand’s personality.

However, if you don’t think this would work for your brand then you should consider thinking about how you can create an emotive or humorous image in some way connected to your product. Look at this humorous example for Webroot Internet Security.

Another tip is to write down your headline. What first comes to your mind when you read it? Have you used a metaphor? It’s often easier to match a picture to a headline than the whole story.

“Professional photographers are too expensive; I can’t afford to pay for photographs to accompany every press release I send out.”

Professional photographers might not be as expensive as you think. If you plan wisely, you can get a lot for your money.

Rather than hiring a photographer on an individual campaign basis, consider making a list of all the campaign activities you will have in upcoming months so you can think about the images you might like to accompany your documents.

It is much cheaper to hire a photographer for a whole day and take a wide range of shots to build your photo library. This collection of photographs can then be shared with your whole team so they can have easy access to photographs when they’re creating documents and presentations.

“We’re a small company we can’t afford fancy digital cameras, never mind a photographer.”

Don’t underestimate the power of your smartphone or tablet. The number of megapixels on these devices is equivalent to the digital cameras people were investing in only a few years ago. Also the quality of apps, such as Instagram, is continually improving.

Though the images these devices produce might not be of high enough quality for printed materials, they can certainly be used across social media and in blog posts. 

“I take terrible photographs; they really wouldn’t be publishable.” 

There are two websites worth checking out if you would like to improve your photography.

Writer and designer Adam Dachis has put together a comprehensive guide on Lifehacker that includes a number of lessons for use with digital cameras. 

Expert Photography provides a thorough Beginner’s Guide to Photography and more than 250 other articles to help you improve your skills whether you are shooting with a camera or a phone. It’s definitely worth a read. 

“I can never get my photographs the way I like them. I would have to buy expensive and complicated editing software or pay someone to edit them for me.”

Photoshop is the undisputed king of photo editing. However, it’s notoriously complicated and expensive. If you don’t want to fork out a whole heap of cash there are great free alternatives. 

The best options we’ve come across are getpaint.net and gimp.org

According to PCMag.com: “Paint.net lives in an interesting space between very basic image manipulation applications like Microsoft Paint and robust big guys like Photoshop.” 

Gimp.org is a credible competitor to Photoshop, and it’s free. You can combine it with Photoshop plug-ins should you feel the package is not extensive enough. Read Brighthub.com’s review for details.

If you’d still rather use Photoshop but don’t want to pay for the full package, try Photoshop Elements. It’s a basic version of the full package at a fraction of the price.

“I am unsure of copyright laws so I would rather avoid using other people’s images.” 

The Copyright, Designs, and Patents Act of 1988 is notoriously complicated and extends to more than 300 sections. Therefore, you should avoid using other people’s photographs unless you are absolutely certain you are not infringing any copyrights.

When you need an image in a hurry, it’s tempting to jump onto Google Images, do a few searches, and see what catches your eye. Of course, many images will be copyrighted. To find images you can freely use, use the advanced search and tick the use rights option that says, “free to use or share, even commercially.” Even then, please credit the original photographer.

The same applies with Flickr, the world’s largest photo-sharing site. Go to the advanced search and select “Creative Commons: find content to use commercially.”

“I find the photographs on these online stock sites are often very cheesy.”

Generally, it’s worth paying for stock photography, although it’s true you have to look hard to find shots that aren’t bland, generic, or cheesy. 

There’s a knack to searching on these sites. Try to think of conceptual search terms that go beyond the obvious. You might, for instance, look for metaphors from nature or perhaps the arts. 

[RELATED: Learn the art of the visual story at this November video summit.]

As with most things, you tend to get what you pay for. Take a look at sites such as Alamy, Shutterstock, iStockphoto, and 123RF, and find the cost/quality ratio you are comfortable with. If you want to buy photos and use them without restrictions, make sure you search for “royalty free.”

So, these are just some solutions. What do you think? Perhaps you have some of your own tricks to add. Please let us know in the comments below. 

Adam Cranfield is the CMO of digital PR firm Mynewsdesk. A version of this story first appeared onthe company’s blog.