Category Archives: CV – Resume

Email Cover Letters: Five Steps To Getting Yours Read

Email Cover Letters: Five Steps To Getting Yours Read.

Email Cover Letters: Five Steps To Getting Yours Read

First impressions count and, in many cases, your first impression is your email cover letter.  When sending a cover letter via email,  the same rules apply as to a paper cover letter.  If you are answering an ad, make sure your read the instructions posted by the employer/recruiter.  Follow these instructions exactly.  If you don’t, your cover letter might not make it into the company’s system or your email may be eliminated.

Image of Email Cover Letters: Five Steps To Getting Yours ReadWhen you send an email cover letter, consider:

1.  The Subject Line.  It’s important.  Unless noted in an ad, don’t put the job number here or leave it blank.  Market yourself using the job title and a few descriptive words.

2.  The Format.  You should follow the format of a paper cover letter.  Include a salutation using a person’s name, if possible, blank lines between paragraphs, and a format closing with your signature information.

3.  Keep It Simple, Short and Concise.  Most hiring managers scan cover letters and want the pitch delivered quickly – 150 words or less.   Sentences should be short, 40 characters is ideal according to research.

4.  Be Specific.  Highlight your skills/abilities that fit the position.  Use words for the ad or job description.  Keywords are a must.

5.  Send a Test Message.  Email the message to yourself and a friend to make sure the formatting works.

Always doublecheck the spelling of names as well as the whole document for typos or grammar mistakes.  Don’t rely on spell check.  Your cover letter should make the reader go to your resume for more information.

Follow the rules to make a good first impression.

Your Name: 5 Reasons To Change It On Your Resume

Your Name: 5 Reasons To Change It On Your Resume.

Your Name: 5 Reasons To Change It On Your Resume

Image of Your Name: 5 Reasons To Change It On Your ResumeAccording to new research in the “European Journal of Social Psychology,” using middle initials can make you seem smarter to people.  In fact, adding more initials continues to boost the perception that you are smarter.   How you present yourself on your resume starts with your name.   Are initials the way to go?  Or should you use a first initial or spell out your entire name?   In the past, first/middle/last name was the formula to follow.  Today, there are many more options:

1.  If you go by a shortened version of your name (Jon/Jonathan, Bob/Robert) use that on your resume.

2.  If you have a common, John Doe, type of name, add your initial or your whole middle name.

3.  If you prefer to use your middle name, go with  J. Victoria Smith.

4.  Junior, III etc. can seem pompous to some hiring managers, so drop them from your resume.

5.  It’s perfectly acceptable to shorten a hard to say name, to use initials or to add a nickname in quotes.

Your resume is your marketing piece.  It should reflect who you are.  When filling out a job application form, use your formal names and suffixes.  Otherwise, be your name!